UNDER RECONSTRUCTION -- Our new beautifully-designed, fully responsive site will soon be unveiled...

Homelands

War, Population and Statehood in Eastern Europe and Russia, 1918-1924

Edited by Nick Baron and Peter Gatrell
 

Homelands

A comprehensive study of war, population and statehood in Eastern Europe and Russia, 1918–1924.

Imprint: Anthem Press
ISBN 9781843311218
August 2004 | 257 Pages | 234 x 155mm / 9.2 x 6.1 | 18+ maps and tables
 
PRICE:  £16.95  /  $27.50  Buy from Amazon.co.uk  Buy from Amazon.com
 
 
9781843311218

About This Book

'An exciting collaborative effort… There is no available study with this scope and intellectual boldness... This volume will be a sure hit with a broad set of reading publics, appropriate for specialists in the field and a very attractive introduction for undergraduate students in history, human rights, international relations, and many other fields.' —Mark von Hagen, Professor of History, Columbia University

'Well defined, authoritative, disciplined and topically innovative… A pioneering publication in an academic field which is just opening up.' —Raymond Pearson, Professor of Modern European History, School of History and International Affairs, University of Ulster

This new volume, by a team of international scholars, explores aspects of population displacement and statehood at a crucial juncture in modern European history, when the entire continent took on the aspect of a 'laboratory atop a mass graveyard' (Tomas Masaryk). The topic of state-building has acquired a new actuality in recent years, following the collapse of the USSR and the 'Soviet bloc' and in view of the complex, often violent, territorial and ethnic conflicts which have ensued. Many of the current dilemmas and tragedies of the region have their origins in the aftermath of World War I, when newly independent nation states, struggling to emerge from the rubble of the former Russian empire, first sought to define themselves in terms of population, territory and citizenship. 'Homelands' examines the interactions of forced migration, state construction and myriad emerging forms of social identity. It opens up a fresh perspective on twentieth-century history and throws new light on present-day political, humanitarian and scholarly issues of crucial concern to political scientists, sociologists, geographers, refugee welfare workers, policymakers and others.

Readership: Of crucial concern to political scientists, sociologists, geographers, refugee welfare workers, policymakers and others.

Author Information

Nick Baron is a Lecturer in History at the University of Nottingham, UK. He works on Russian and East European history and historical geography.

Peter Gatrell is Professor of Modern History at the University of Manchester, UK. His main research and teaching interests are in the field of modern European social, economic and cultural history, with a particular focus on modern Russia.

Table of Contents

List of Maps, List of Tables; Acknowledgements; Contributors; Introduction; 1. War, Population Discplacement and State Formation in the Russian Borderlands, 1914-1924; 2. Latvian Refugees and the Latvian Nation State During and After World War One; 3. In Search of National Support: Belarusian Refugees in World War One and the People's Republic of Belarus; 4. In Search of a Native Realsm: The Return of World War One Refugees to Lithuania, 1918-1924; 5. Population Displacement and Citizenship in Poland, 1918-24; 6. The Repatriation of Polish Citizens from Soviet Ukraine to Poland in 1921-2; 7. 'Sybiraki': Siberian and Manchurian Returnees in Independent Poland; 8. Refugees in the Urals Region, 1917-1925; 9. Armenia: the 'Nationalization', Internationalization and Representation of the Refugee Crisis;  Conclusions: On Living in a 'New Country'