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Collected Works of Ann Hawkshaw

Collected Works of Ann Hawkshaw

By Ann Hawkshaw, Edited by Debbie Bark

Anthem Nineteenth-Century Series

Along with a biographical and critical introduction, ‘The Collected Works of Ann Hawkshaw’ brings together Hawkshaw’s four volumes of poetry and republishes them together for the first time. An appendix of reviews and contemporary criticism of Hawkshaw’s work is included, along with details of the republication of individual poems.

PDF, 508 Pages

ISBN:9781783081134

January 2014

£20.00, $32.00

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About This Book

‘The Collected Works of Ann Hawkshaw’ brings together Hawkshaw’s four volumes of poetry and republishes them together for the first time. Some two hundred years after her birth into a large family of Dissenters in the West Riding of Yorkshire, the publication of ‘The Collected Works’ reflects the growing interest in Hawkshaw’s poetry and life. As the span of three decades between the first and last examples of Hawkshaw’s writing suggests, her poetry offers an exceptional insight into the changing political and religious landscape of the mid-nineteenth century. The themes of death, religion, science, history and nation that run through Hawkshaw’s poetry demonstrate her capacity for extended critical thought, as she engages with subjects at the heart of nineteenth-century cultural and religious debates whilst challenging the work of established scholars and writers.

Writing in a strong, independent and perceptive voice, Hawkshaw makes a valuable contribution to the Manchester poetic revival of 1830s and 1840s, and to political debates over abolitionism and the Poor Law Amendment. Her defence of natural theology in light of scientific progress and her skilful use of the sonnet sequence to engage with nineteenth-century historiographies of the Anglo-Saxon period are also notable. Elsewhere, Hawkshaw draws on her experience as a mother to write tender and poignant elegies on childhood death, addressing several poems to her own children and grandchild.

As well as providing a biography of Hawkshaw, who was married to the leading Victorian engineer Sir John Hawkshaw and related by marriage to the Darwin-Wedgwood family, the editor’s introduction and notes draw attention to several of Hawkshaw’s most significant poems and their critical reception, making connections between her poetry and the work of Felicia Hemans, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Wordsworth, Gaskell and Pater. 

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Author Information

Ann Hawkshaw (1812–1885) was born into a large family of dissenters in rural Yorkshire and, by the time of her death, she was a titled, affluent poet moving amidst the most influential circles of the age.

Debbie Bark lectures on nineteenth-century studies in the Department of English Literature at the University of Reading. She has published a number of articles on Ann Hawkshaw which focus on situating the poet’s life and work in their literary and cultural context.

Series

Anthem Nineteenth-Century Series

Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgements; Biographical Introduction; 1842: ‘Dionysius the Areopagite’ with other poems; 1843: Life’s Dull Reality; 1847: Poems for My Children; 1854: Sonnets on Anglo-Saxon History; 1871: Cecil’s Own Book; Appendix A; Appendix B; Bibliography; Index of Titles; Index of First Lines

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